Category Archives: tutorial

Emboss Resist with a Twist

What happens when something goes wrong on your card or scrapbook design? Do you start over or see if you can fix it?

My memory of an old technique saved the day and enabled me to fix a problem with gunk getting embedded in my heat-embossed image. And I love it!

It all began with this colour challenge from the As You See It Challenge blog:

I was a little worried with the intensity of these colours, but by using the coloured ink instead of coloured cardstock, I was able to keep my design from getting too loud.

I wanted to get a jump on my holiday cards, so I went with a Christmas design using the Carols of Christmas stamp set and the Card Front Builder Thinlits.

I call this technique, “Emboss Resist with a Twist” or “Emboss Resist and Wipe”. The second name definitely gives you a better understanding of what this technique involves.

The regular emboss resist technique, as you may know, is when you heat emboss an image, usually with clear embossing powder, then sponge or paint with a water-based ink over the image. The embossed area resists the ink and often it is advised to use a paper towel to polish any ink residue off of the embossed image to make it really pop. With the “Emboss Resist with a Twist” technique, you take it another step: Heat the clear embossed image and, while the embossing powder is still warm and soft from being reheated, wipe it with a paper towel to remove it from the surface of your paper!

Wait, WHAT!?

Why would you want to remove it, you ask? Once it’s removed and all the shine has been wiped clean from your cardstock, the image remaining will be more crisp, more white, and will have a beautiful matte finish.

Another reason to remove it is when you make a gunky mistake, like I did! I used the regular emboss resist technique, then ran my piece of cardstock through the Big Shot to cut the beautiful border from the Card Front Builder thinlit dies. To my dismay, I discovered that my dirty embossing plates left a bunch of dark specs of old paper dust and bits embedded into my embossed image!!  EW! Heating and wiping the embossing finish away allowed me to clean up my mess without having to start over again!

I absolutely love how it looks!

The rest of the card came fairly quickly. I used my markers to ink up the rubber on my holly stamp from the Carols of Christmas stamp set so that I could have Lemon Lime Twist leaves with a spackling of Elegant Eggplant around the edges, but still have Real Red berries. After doing the old huffing-with-your-breath-on-the-stamp-to-remoisten-the-ink technique, I stamped the holly image and die cut it with the co-ordinating die from the Card Front Builder Thinlits. This was attached with half of a Mini Dimensional to my card front.

The beautiful little ornament image was also coloured with markers. I used Real Red and Elegant Eggplant to only colour two of the three ornaments, then used Basic Gray for the string of the ornament. I used a sticky note to mask the bottom of the sentiment as my stamp was too tall for where I wanted it, then I huffed once again and stamped the image. I also used a Blender Pen to blend some of the ink in the each ornament on my paper, then added a small bead glue with the Fine Tip Glue Pen to the center of each ornament to I could apply Dazzling Diamonds Glitter. The Linen Thread, tied into a tiny little bow was attached with a carefully rolled Glue Dot.

I wanted a little something-something behind my card front, so I adhered a piece of Dazzling Diamonds Glimmer paper to my card base before attaching my completed card front to it with Stampin’ Up! Dimensionals. Tip: Because of the nature of glitter, even on Glimmer Paper, I was liberal with the Dimensionals and used generous pressure to ensure good contact the the Glimmer paper. If this isn’t done, you might find that your card front detaches without your permission!

If you’re in my area, this card will be offered at my technique class. Contact me if you’d like to join us!

Be sure to give this colour combination a try and load it up on the As You See It Challenge page so we can see your beautiful creations.

 

Watercolour Carousel

Watercolouring is such a beautiful look and can seem like a difficult venture. But it doesn’t have to be a challenge. This card is created using a simple watercolour technique combined with the emboss resist. Easy peasy!Watercolour Carousel card by Amy Jasper www.inkingonthefly.com

I started by stamping the carousel image from the Carousel Birthday stamp set with Versamark ink on Stampin Up’s Watercolor Cardstock. Then I added some clear embossing powder to the image, tapped off the excess and heat set it with my Heat Tool until the image was clear and shiny.

Next, I applied water over the image. Just clear water using my Aqua Painter for a mess-free experience. I put the water only where I wanted my colour and applied it quite liberally to get the watercolour cardstock good and wet!

The inks came next: First I picked up some Bermuda Bay with my Aqua Painter and applied it to the top most section of my wet cardstock. I didn’t have to move the ink around very much as the water I had applied first did most of the work for me. I cleaned off my brush and picked up some Calypso Coral ink and applied it to the middle section of the area being careful to avoid having it touch the Bermuda Bay too much (that would just get muddy looking and nobody likes a muddy fairground!). Lastly, I cleaned off my brush again and used it to apply some Peek-a-boo Peach ink to the lower portion of my watered cardstock. To get the best colour saturation, I made sure that I used a drop of Ink Refill in the lid of each of these colours. This allowed me to pick up a nicely concentrated amount of ink on my Aqua Painter brush.

watercolour carousel card by Amy Jasper www.inkingonthefly.comWhen I was happy with my colours, I set that aside to dry and continued with the rest of the card. The image doesn’t end up coloured with the rest of the paper because the embossing repells the ink, not allowing it to saturate those areas of the watercolour cardstock.

Sahara Sand cardstock was used for the card base, then a layer of Tip Top Taupe. The patterned paper used is from the Cupcakes and Carousels Designer Series Paper Stack from Stampin’ Up. I used one larger strip across the front of the card and another smaller strip as an accent behind the Very Vanilla banner. The sentiment, also from the Carousel Birthday stamp set, was inked using my Stampin’ Up Markers (Bermuda Bay, Early Espresso, and Calypso Coral), on which I “huffed” with my breath to re-moisten the ink before stamping it on the Very Vanilla cardstock.

When my watercoloured image was dry, I could add it as my next layer using Stampin’ Up Dimensionals. The banner ends were hand cut with my Paper Snips; the patterned paper banner adhered directly, while the Very Vanilla banner with the sentiment was adhered using Stampin’ Up Dimensionals.

Almost done! It just needed some bling, so I added a strip of three Basic Rhinestones just below the right side of the banner and one single larger Basic Rhinestone to the center of the carousel image.

watercolour carousel card by Amy Jasper www.inkingonthefly.comI hope you like it. I sure do! It’s sooo pretty!

Be sure to leave me a hello and let me know if you’ve tried this watercolouring technique before and how it worked out for you.

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Now Available: Premium Tutorial Pack

I am so excited to join a group of very talented Stampin’ up Demonstrators from around the world to bring you a very special package of tutorials. Every month we will offer a collection of 12 high-quality tutorials to guide you in your crafting using all of the most current and on trend Stampin’ Up products.

design-team

In November, our creative team chose to highlight project ideas using the stamp sets from the current 25% off Sale as well as ideas with the new Stitched Shapes Framelits!

You’re now probably asking yourself, “Self, how do I get my hands on one of these amazing tutorial packs?”

Here’s how:

Order C$60 or more in my online store between November 1-30 using host code DMKMSXFD and get the PDF file for FREE!
Ordering more than C$200 in products? Don’t use the code and enjoy 10% in Stampin’ Rewards AND get the PDF file for FREE!
Need help placing your order? Let me do the work for you! Send me an email and I will take care of the rest.
Join my team! Everyone on my team gets these tutorials for FREE!
Or you can purchase the PDF directly with my new fancy fan-dangled purchase button below!

premium-tutorial-pack

[purchase_link id=”1309″ style=”button” color=”green” text=”Purchase”]

 

And if you have already placed a qualifying order with me this month or are a member of my team of Stampin’ Up demonstrators – then your copy will be sent to you!

Happy stamping!

 

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Little Letters Stenciled T-shirt

This is the year that I turned 42 and I really wanted a shirt with a quote from “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy“. When I couldn’t find one, I decided I would make my own.

I wanted to share with you how I did it, using Freezer Paper, Tulip Fabric Paint, Stampin’ Up thinlits and dies and the Big Shot die cutting machine. For the featured project, I used Little Letters thinlits (recently retired) and the long retired Typeset Alphabet Bigz Die.

step 1First thing to do is to select a t-shirt. This one is a cheap thin shirt that I purchased on sale at Superstore. It is a cotton blend and is nice and smooth to take the paint easily.

I put a large piece of cardboard inside the t-shirt to prevent paint from leaking through the shirt onto the back. What a mess that would be! I did some eyeball measurements in addition to a few actual measurements to do my best to make sure my letters would be straight and centered. Then I began cutting out the letters using my Big Shot and the freezer paper.

step 2Washi tape is a gentle way to secure the freezer paper in place as I positioned them on my shirt. Don’t forget to check and double check your spelling!!

IMG_8756Then I ironed the freezer paper with a medium heat, careful to avoid the washi tape, removing it as the freezer paper began to adhere to the fabric.

(I had to very carefully take the cardboard out of the shirt for this step, so I could slide it onto the ironing board. – when I do this again, I will probably put the shirt on the ironing board during the placement of the letters, then add the protective cardboard just for the painting process.)

IMG_8757You’ll notice that some of the letters are missing the centers. You could leave it that way or add them in later (don’t forget to save them when you die cut the letters to begin with!)

IMG_8758It can be a challenge to get those little bits straight in these small letters. I took my time.

IMG_8760When everything is in place and secured with the iron, you can use the fabric paint and a foam brush to apply paint to your stenciled letters. I used a stippling motion with my brush positioned horizontally, then vertically, on the letters to ensure full coverage.

IMG_8762I had to be careful when painting my large letters as there were small spaces in between each letter. This is what it looked like after two coats of fabric paint. (I didn’t even wait between coats)

IMG_8763As soon as your fabric paint is pretty well absorbed (make sure there aren’t any pools of paint- you shouldn’t be using that much!), you can start slowly peeling off the freezer paper.

IMG_8765I used my paper-piercing tool to help me lift the smaller pieces of freezer paper for removal. My paint wasn’t completely dry and I didn’t want to get any on my fingers or cause the paint to smudge.

IMG_8766Finally, I allowed the shirt to dry overnight. The last step was to turn the shirt inside out and heat-set the paint in the dryer.

IMG_8868The result is a cute, custom-made t-shirt! I can’t wait to make more!

I hope you’ll give it a try! Stampin’ Up! has a new set of Large Letter Framelits that would be perfect for this project!

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